Frida Baranek

Frida Baranek (born 1961 Rio de Janeiro) is a Brazilian sculptor.
She graduated from Universidade Santa Úrsula, with a Bachelor's degree in Architecture, and from Parsons School of Design with a master’s degree in 1985. Her works are held by the São Paulo Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, University of São Paulo, the Kemper Art Museum, and the National Museum of Women in the Arts. She creates organic forms and subjects using inorganic materials e.g., “Untitled”, (1985) stone, wood boxes, bulbs and electric wire, and "Como vai você, Geração 80? [How are you, Generation 80?]”, (1984), Steel. “Como vai você, Geração 80?” is incorporated into and organic material (water) and it flows throughout the water seamlessly. Sculptures such as “Dormindo em Veneza [Sleeping in Venice]”, (1990), “Bolo [Cake]”, (1990), and Não classificado [Unclassified], (1992) incorporate puffs of steel wool and sheets of steel that shimmer like constellations.
Others take the form of fences and screens to evoke mass and space e.g. Untitled, (1988) iron flexible, plates and stones and Untitled, (1991) steel rods and wire. Latent references to women’s work are also incorporated in her sculptures. The artist also knits and weaves thin thread into womb and bag-like forms like in her sculpture “Swirls Bege", (2008). Baranek’s overwhelming tangles and whiskered sacs refer to the sexual symbol of women’s hair; this is not only a symbol of inclination, but of danger as well. Other materials used in her sculptures are stones, springs, bars, glass, air chambers, tires, rubber balls, water, sand, etc.
In 1984, in a selected group exhibition called "Como vai você, Geração 80?” at the Escola de Artes Visuais in Rio de Janeiro Brazil, Baranek created a stained plastic buoy floating in Rodrigo de Freitas Lake. The buoy is similar to the shape of the Dois Irmãos Mountain, that is close to the exhibition and is 0.9 meters wide and 30. meters long. The buoy is surrounded by water. The sculpture’s satin surface that is silver reflects light bouncing off the water. Baranek’s sculptures reflect a skewed reality, strangeness, and unexpected poetical relationships.

Her works are held by the São Paulo Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, University of São Paulo, the Kemper Art Museum, and the National Museum of Women in the Arts.





0 comentarios: